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Full text of "Nisatin (1938)"



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N I S A T I N 



{at the foot of the mountain) 




State Teachers College at North Adams 
nineteen hundred thirty -eight 



CONTENTS 



DEDICATION 7 

FACULTY 14 

SENIORS 16 

HISTORY 39 

WILL 41 

PROPHECY 43 

UNDERCLASSMEN . ... as 

ACTIVITIES 52 

ADVERTISEMENTS .... 69 



DEDICATION 




WALLACE H. VENABLE 

for his quiet and unostentatious yet 

firm and thoughtful guidance of our 

class, we respectfully dedicate this 

yearbook . 



TO THE CLASS OF 1938: 

J. N A FEW days you will be leaving college; but in all the years to come, the college 
can never leave you. With you will ever be the memories of the experiences, the 
friendships and loves of four glorious years of youth. Much of the knowledge 
which you so laboriously acquired will be forgotten — but the spirit of learning 
and the joy of scholarship will not depart. The glimpses of truth and beauty given 
you here will make it impossible for you to be satisfied with anything less than the 
best in life. This is the final measure of your education. 

You go out to teach. To the throngs of children into whose lives you are to 
come, may you bring only that which you have found to be good and true. Out of 
your own richness in living may you give freely and gladly to those less fortunate 
so that they, in their turn, may be released from poverty of mind and spirit. This 
will be the true measure of your teaching. 

May the dreams of your youth come true. 

Grover C. Bowman, President 




President Grover C. Bowman 
Williams B.A 

Yale M.A. 

Lillian Boyden 

Boston University B.S., M.A. 

Harry S. Broudy 

Boston University B.A. 
Harvard M,A., Ph.D. 

Thomas Cummings 

Grace L. Donelson 

Andrew S. Flagg 

Mass. School of Art B.S. in Ed. 

Roger F. Holmes 
Wesleyan B.A. 
Boston University Ed.M. 



College Faculty 

Elizabeth M. Jenkins 
Columbia M.A. 



Edmund Luddy 

Boston College B.A. 
Boston University M.A. 

Mary Underhill 
Radcliffe B.A., M.A. 
Harvard Ed.M. 

Wallace H. Venable 

University of Vermont B.S. 
Columbia M.A. 

Beth A. Weston 

Boston University B.S., Ed.M. 

Blanid Queeney, Matron 

Framingham State Teachers College 
B.S. in Ed. 



11 




Training School Faculty 



Fannie A. Bishop, B.S.E. 

Alice M. Card 

Ethel M. Carpenter 

Viola Cooper 

Martha E. Durnin, B.S.E. 

E. Idella Haskins 

Catherine L. Tobin, B.S.E. 



Marion H. Ketchuin 
Loretta J. Loft us 
Veronica A. Loft us 
Ruth A. Lyman 
Helen E. Mallery 
Mary Nagle 



15 



SENIORS 

We have spent jour happy years here 
At our college in the Berkshires, 
Making friendships we'll remember 
After time has dimmed our vision. 




in 
in 
< 

U 

(4 
O 

Z 
— 
in 



MILDRED BOYD 

"Affection warm, and faith sincere. 
And soft humanity are here." 

Class Vice-President (1,2,3,4); Drama Club 

(1,2,3,4), Vice-President (2); W.A.A. Secretary 
(2), Treasurer (3); Beacon Staff (3); \isniiii 
Staff (4); Glee Club (1,2,3,4); "I'll Leave It To 
You" (3); President's List, Mid-year l°-.'5tS; 
Chairman of Freshman Dance; Ivy Oration (3); 
Archery 




^IIE'S versatile, that girl Billie. Hark to her list of accomplishments. She writes 
cleverly, both music and literature — witness the class history. She dances well - 
a break for the men at the proms. She mimics — did you ever hear her rendition 
of Stepin Fetchit or Donald Duck? She is an actress in her own right — remember 
Faith Crombie? She sings — for the entertainment of others as well as herself. 
Add to all this, she is a winner when it comes to teaching. » » » There is 
never a dull moment with Bill in our midst. Our college lives would have seemed 
incomplete without those witty tales, those entertaining acts, those thoughtfully 
considerate deeds. 



19 




SHIRLEY CHAMPLIN 

"The great woman is she who does not lose 
her child's heart." 

House Council (3,4), President (4); Student 
Council (2); Framingham Conference (2); 
Drama Club (1,2,3,4), Treasurer (2), Nice- 
President (3); Nisatin Staff (4), Beacon Staff 
(3); Glee Club (1,2,3,4); Poetry Club (4); 
"Twig of Thorn" (1); "Icebound" (2); "I'll 
LeaveltTo You" (3); President's List, Mid-year, 
1938; Basketball: W.A.A. 



ii 






1 OR she's a jolly good fellow . . ." A welcome addition to any class is this 
lass with her alert and vivacious personality. Shirl goes her happy way, squeezing 
as much fun out of life as her high spirits and the dorm rules will allow. » » .» 
She is an intriguing combination of seriousness and hilarity — the woman and the 
child. At one moment she may he convincingly dynamic in the fight against the 
menace of war. In the next she may be planning ways in which to add to her col- 
lection of china dogs. » » » From Shirl we may well take to heart the lesso'i 
that both hard work and play are essential to complete success. She has wo'i a 
high place in our affections. To know her is to invite happiness. 



20 



RUTH COHEN 

" Knowledge is of two kinds. We know a 
subject ourselves, or we know where we 
can find information about it." 

Glee Club (1,2,4); Current Events Club (4); 
Class Finance Committee (4); Soccer; W.A.A. 




v 



o 



NE OF the most difficult tasks that we know of is to train ourselves to read 
something in a newspaper besides the ''funnies." Ruth's ability to read a paper 
thoroughly and conscientiously, and to remember accurately what is worth re- 
calling, shows how steady application of mind can achieve results. » ,, ,, An 
unusual amount of the spirit of cooperation is an integral part in the make-up of 
Ruth's character. Whatever the task, she is always willing to do her share, and 
usually she does more. » ,, ,, Ruth shows a lively interest in learning. Books, 
concerts, lectures — and, we mustn't forget, radio programs, she finds valuable 
in helping to gain an intelligent outlook on the world. ,, », „ Ruthie will 
never know monotony, nor will others when she is with them. 



21 




CLAIRE DEMPSEY 

"Do not delay. 
Do not delay: the golden moments fly." 

Drama Club (1,2,3,4), President (4); Nisatin 
Staff (4); Glee Club (1,2,3,4); Freshman Class 
Chairman (2,3); Art Club (4); Poetry Club (4); 
Salem Conference (4); "Twig of Thorn" (1); 
"I'll Leave It To You" (3); Soccer; W.A.A. 



G 



/LAIRE Dempsey? Business manager of the Nisatin? Well of course — who else. 
She has a business head on her shoulders, is economical too, and has a way of mak- 
ing a small amount of class money accomplish a tremendous amount of work. She 
is adept at managing almost anything — from a publication to a prom. » » » 
Claire is a loyal supporter of any activity whether it is selling tickets for a play or 
assisting on an assembly program. She puts herself wholeheartedly into it. What's 
more, she shows herself able to take orders as well as issue them. » » » She 
proves herself an all around girl, ready to take the fun along with the responsibilities. 
Claire's sparkling blue eyes and mirth-provoking smile will linger long in our 
memories. 



22 



RUTH DENISON 
"/ would study, I would know." 

Drama Club (1,2,3,4), Secretary (3); Glee Club 
(1,2,3,4); Poetry Club (4); Ensemble (2,3); 
House Council (1,2,3,4), Vice-President (3,4); 
Nisatin Staff (4); Fire Chief (3); "Twig of 
Thorn" (1); Class Finance Committee (3); 
President's List, Mid-year 1938; Basketball; 
W.A.A. 




R. 



.UTHIE — sweet and gentle by nature. We believe she is an answer to any 
instructor's prayer. Conscientious and thorough in homework: punctual in handing 
in material; politely attentive to even the dullest lectures, — Ruth is the ideal 
student, yet she retains her sense of humor and love of fun. » » » Extra 
eurricular as well as curricular activities attract her attention. Largely as a result 
of her efforts as chairman, our first public dance was a success. » » » When 
given a task she proceeds with vitality and precision, carefully and intelligently 
following it through. She is an example of the fastidiousness which should be the 
aim of any teacher, or for that matter of any girl. » » » Because of her 
disposition Ruthie makes a steadfast companion, a true playfellow, and a charming 
friend in the game of life. 



23 




HELEN GRAVELLE 

"The eves arc charmed by paintings, the 

cars by music." 

Glee Club (1,2,3,4), President (3,4); Art Club 
(1,2,3,4); Dramatic Club (1,2,3,4); Current 
Events Club (1); (lass Song, Music; Nisatin 
Staff (4); "S.T.C.N.A."; Archery: W.A.A. 



T< 



O ALL outward appearances Helen seems lighthearted and untroubled by the 
fretful cares of everyday life. We feel sure, however, that the president of a glee 
club must have had a tiny worry now and then. » » » She had proved her- 
self invaluable to the school and indispensable to the class whenever a skilled pianist 
was needed. A concert? Helen can dash off something classical. A school party? 
Get Helen Gravelle to play some swing music. » » » We are inclined to be- 
lieve in the saying that a person who has talent along one aesthetic line may be 
gifted in another artistic field The fact that we owe part of the success of the 
Nisatin to Helen's clever sketches bears out this statement. » » » Here is 
one girl who will never lack for hobbies. We only hope the profession of teaching 
will leave her a hit of time in which to pursue them. 



21 



DORIS JACOB 

"To be nameless in worthy deeds exceeds 
an infamous history." 

Student Council, President (4); Glee Club 
(1,2,4); Drama Club (1,2,3,4); W.A.A., Treas- 
urer (2); Boston Conference (4); "Twig of Thorn" 
(1); "S.T.C.N.A."; Basketball 




N. 



I EVER disorderly, always the personification of good taste — that's Dot. 
She has that flair for wearing clothes that is commonly called chic. We would like 
to say that sport and tailored clothes give the effect. The one flaw in this convincing 
bit of rationalizing is the fact that Dot looks equally attractive in a frilly evening 
gown. » » » Dot has an unfathomable sense of humor which makes her a 
cheery, congenial companion. » » » Good taste, good humor, and good com- 
mon sense prevail in her actions. Upon her we have placed the most responsible 
of school positions, that of being President of the Student Council. 
Summed up in a few words we would call her a genuine good sport, known by all 
and liked. Success cannot but come her way. 



» » » 



25 




MARGARET LaFONTAINE 

"My eyes make pictures when thev are 
shut." 



Class Treasurer (1,2,3,4); Nisatin Staff (4); 
Ensemble (1,2,3,4); Glee Club (1,2,3,4); "The 
Twig of Thorn" (1); "I'll Leave It To You" (3) 
Ivy Oration (3); Chairman of Senior Formal 
"S. T.C.N. A."; Soccer; Salem Conference (4) 
Drama Club (1,2,3,4); W.A.A. 



OH ALL we say that she possesses that "elusive, intangible, indefinable some- 
thing" known as charm? To us it appears to be natural rather than acquired poise 
which surrounds her. Whatever it may be, she has the power of making one feel at 
ease in her presence; and also a still greater power — that of appearing at ease in 
the presence of others. » » » The ensemble will regret losing such a loyal 
member. Her unfailing assistance has always brought success to every ensemble 
appearance. » » » Drama is another of the arts towards which she turns. 
She excels in this, as she does in anything which she genuinely likes. » » » 
Added to her list of achievements we find that Peg also plays a mean game of soccer. 
Charming? Yes. Versatile? Yes. Unmindful of it all, she goes calmly and graciously 
on her way — a true lady. 



26 



MARGARET LANOUE 

''Wisdom does not shew itself so much in 
precept as in life — a firmness of mind 
and mastery of appetite." 

Nisatin Editor; Student Council (3,4) Secre- 
tary-Treasurer (3,4); Class Song, Words; 
Chairman of Ring Committee (3); Beacon Staff 
(1,3); Massachusetts Press Conference (2); 
Salem Conference (4); President's List, Mid- 
year 1938; "Twig of Thorn" (1); Drama Club 
(1,2,3,4); Glee Club (1,2,3,4); Art Club (4); 
Current Events Club (4); Badminton; W.A.A. 





D, 



URING our tour years at school we have sensed a growing admiration for 
Margaret. At first we envied her consistently high scholastic standing. As our 
contacts became more intimate we realized th.it she possessed other abilities which 
were valuable to us as a class. We depended on her discriminating taste and in- 
telligent judgments at times of stress and strain » » » She performed her 
duties well. How competently she pursued her task of collecting student dues! » 
» » Notwithstanding the fact that at times she may have seemed rather serious, 
we can't forget that contagious giggle that found its way into our hearts. » » » 
In our mental picture of Babe we shall inevitably find ourselves thinking of a person 
who is skilled in the art of book larnin', who is effervescent with the joys of living, 
and who is a good friend — in need and indeed. » » » Don't let that Ph.D. 
change you, Babe! 




SIGRID LOBDELL 

" Her soft cheeks make the maple fade. 
Such tint, such bloom, was theirs alone." 

Glee Club (1); Drama Club (3,4); Poetry Club 
(4); Current Events Club (-1); President's List, 
Mid-year 1938; Basketball; W.A.A. 



Ti 



HAT lovely velvety complexion which Siggie possesses is characteristic of her 
Norwegian heritage. She may well pride herself upon it. Sig is that blond Nordic 
type of which we cannot talk lest a bit of envy creeps in. » » » We also wish 
we might be able to talk or write as intelligently on as many subjects as Sig does. 
She is able to keep a conversation rolling along and make it entertaining as well 
as enlightening. » » » She has a kindly word for whomever she meets and 
is deeply sincere when she sympathizes with anyone. Helpful in our times of sorrow 
and joyous in our times of gladness, she is able to put herself in the other person's 
position — to be sad when others are sad and happy when others are glad. » » 
» We wish we could have seen more of her than we did in her sporadic appear- 
ances at extra-curricular activities, but she has made her permanent impression 
on us, just the same. 



28 



CLARA McCORMICK 

"Wit, now and then, struck smartly, shows 
a spark." 

Permanent Member of Dance Committee; Glee 
Club (1,2), Treasurer (2); W.A.A. 




T, 



() THOSE who do not know her, Clara gives t lit- impression of being rather 

abstracted. She possesses a hidden subtle wit which emerges at special occasions. 
In fact, her remarks are few and far between, but they can pierce the conversation 
with the unexpectedness and sharpness of a sudden explosion. Having recovered 
from the shock we are impressed with the fact that only Clara could have phrased 
the remark in words which were so devastating. » » » Her greatest asset 
is her unselfish willingness to assist at any occasion. With a sincere spirit of help- 
fulness and sympathy she accepts her share. She also possesses that rare ability of 
being able to get along with anyone, at any time, and under any circumstances. 
» » » Above all, we appreciate the fact that she is an excellent listener. Per- 
haps that is one of the main secrets of her success. 



29 




ALICE McGRATH 

"My own thoughts 
Are mv companions." 



Archerv; W.A.A. 



AL'S amiable nature makes her one of those priceless individuals who, though 
non-committal, are agreeable and easily dealt with. We have yet to witness the 
occasion when her accommodating spirit is lacking. » » » She is apt to keep 
her thoughts to herself, and when troubled or worried she does not burden others 
with her cares. This attitude of bearing her share of trouble we noticed particularly 
when she was confined at home for one third of our sophomore year by a broken leg. 
>» » » To take everything as it comes along shows that she possesses that quality 
of sportsmanship so essential to complete happiness. » » » She is extremely 
modest about one of her talents — playing the piano. As accompanist in our senior 
talent show, we had an opportunity to appreciate it. » » » It is gratifying 
to know a person who is without pretension, her own natural self at all times. 



30 



BETTY NEYLAND 

"Those graceful acts, those thousand de- 
cencies that daily flow from all her words 
and actions.^ 

Class President (1,2,3,4); Student Council (1,2,- 
3,4); Drama Ciub (1,2,3,4); Glee Club (1,2,3,4); 
Poetry Club (4); "Twig of Thorn" (1); "I'll 
Leave It To You" (3); W.A.A. Conference 
(3,4); New York Conference (3); President's 
List, Mid-year, 1938; "S.T.C.N.A."; Basket- 
ball; W.A.A. 




T< 



O MEET Betty is to come in contact with a personality that unconsciously 
elicits the best in itself through the conscious effort of being considerate of others. 
» » » Who else could have made so capable an executive? A combination of 
delightfully contrasting traits gives her a rarity of character that is essential to 
the true leader. Serious, reticent, understanding at times; at others buoyant of 
spirit, entertainingly enthusiastic; and always deceivingly nonchalant if the oc- 
casion demands nonchalance. » » » Betty is an eager sports enthusiast. 
Each approaching season brings with it a new sporting thrill for her. Swimming, 
tennis, basketball, skiing, hiking, etc. etc. have given her a radiant appearance. 
» » » Efficient and lovable leader of this, the class of '38, we can think of noth- 
ing more fitting to say than, "May success and happiness be yours and may we 
learn to appreciate you as you truly deserve." 



31 




FLORENCE PELTIER 

*'ff hen you do dance, I wish you a ware 
o' the sea, that you might even do nothing 
but that." 

Glee Club (1,2,4); Poetry Club (4); Nisalin 
Staff (4); Beacon Staff (3); Chairman of Senior 
Formal; "S.T.C.N.A."; Basketball; W.A.A. 



"A 

/"ANA CHANCE of a ride downtown? ' » » » Miss Florence Peltier, free 
taxi driver lor S.T.C., may calmly remark: "Come along, I have only seven pas- 
sengers now. We can squeeze you in somewhere." We say she may calmly remark 
because this is no unusual occurrence. She has always been more than generous 
with the use of her car. What we would have done without her it is impossible to 
say. Flo's life is overflowing with an animatedness which is evident in all that she 
does. The same spirited vitality which one notices about her dancing is also in 
evidence on the basketball court. She has a likable impetuousness about her. It is 
this unpredictable quality that keeps life from being dull for her and for us, for 
incidentally, riding in the car with her is a rather exciting pleasure. 



32 



BERTHA RAY 

"Too busy with the crowded hour to fear 
to live or die." 

Nisatin Staff (4); Salem Conference (4); Chair- 
man of Junior Prom; Drama Club (3,4); Art 
Club (4); Poetry Club (4); Glee Club (1,4); 
Class Poem (3); Commuter's Club (4); Soccer; 
W.A.A. 




a 



G 



LOOD tilings come in small packages." This smallest package inourclass 
contains so much vitality, so much liveliness, so much talent that the rest of us can 
not but stand and wonder. But because she is tiny, do not think that she will be 
compelled to teach tiny children, tor she has the determination and perseverance 
that will make her a successful teacher of even junior high school boys. However 
we would not be surprised to find someday the name of Bertha Hay at the top in 
the costume designing industry, or the theatrical make-up business, or the literary 
elite, or even the musical world, for in all these fields she has shown her ability. 
Bert, as our official make-up artist, has very effectively transformed our actresses 
into old ladies, young men, or old men as the role demanded. Her courage, am- 
bition, determination, and sincerity have demanded our greatest respect and 
admiration. 



33 




CHARLOTTE ROKITA 

"I love my duty, love my friend. 
Love truth and merit to defend." 

Class Finance Committee (4); Reading Club 
(1,2,3); Soccer; W.A.A. 



T, 



HIS lady of the flashing brown eyes possesses an extremely keen insight into 
the ways of people. Her sense of humor is searching, and she has the rare ability 
to see the joke when it is on herself. Another trait that it would be wise to learn 
from her is that of systematic and precise workmanship. She gave herself to the 
task of helping to increase the class fund and through her untiring efforts we raised 
a goodly amount. » » » Charlotte has a hobby which intrigues us all. She 
dresses dolls in their native costumes. The workmanship is exquisite and the re- 
sults are dainty and lovely to look at. » » » As for her athletic prowess, she 
was one of the main reasons why we would have liked to play the other Teachers 
Colleges in soccer. She was a crack player in more ways than one. 



34 



CHARLOTTE VAN DAM 

"On (heir own merits modest men are 
dumb." 

W.A.A., President (4), Vice-President (3); 

Class Secretary (1,2,3,4); Beacon Staff (3); 

Drama Club (1,2,3,4); "Twig of Thorn" (I); 
"S.T.C.N.A."; Soccer 




^ -,#* 



« - 




IT'S grand to have known Charlotte. Modest of nature, she lias become "More 
bright from obscurity." Being an unobtrusive person, she will not even take that 
credit she rightfully deserves. Not only as a class but as a school have we shown 
our belief in her ability by electing her to the position of President of the W.A.A. 
» » » Had we left it to Charlotte to tell you, probably you would not know that 
she has the highest P.F.I. (Physical Fitness Index) of anyone in the school. Perhaps 
it is because of this that her capacity for endurance is boundless. » » » If we 
weren't afraid that she wouldn't appreciate being held up as a. model, we might 
mention her superhuman ability to come punctually to meetings, basketball games, 
and rehearsals, a quality that the re«t of us would do well to cultivate. » » » 
A rare personality is hers, of cool efficiency combined with the ardor of ambition. 



35 



ALEXANDER CLEMENT 

A real breadwinner is Mr. Clement, but he has won more than material sus- 
tenance this year, for he has gained our respect and pleasure at having one more 
"boy" on our school roll. 

We wish him the fulfillment of all his ambitions. 




LEONE GOULD 



-j*»" 



We at once found Lee, a newcomer this year, generous beyond measure, 
conscientious, adjustable to our ways which have not always been easy for even all 
of us to accept. She came to us from Vermont, but Massachusetts may choose to 
steal such a capable teacher from the maple sugar state. 



36 



MARY LALOR 

"Lollipop" we call her. The name may seem irrelevant, but not when it is 
attached to such a sweet, likable girl. Mary is certainly one who puts plenty into 
every moment of her life and thereby gains much that everyone covets. We're glad 
that she could enjoy the opportunities at Our Lady of the Elms and still find oc- 
casion to favor us with a year of her presence. 



AGNES HEILLV 




Miss Reilly. although an experienced school-marm, has not permeated our 
classes with the spirit of a worn, cross teacher, but has presented herself as one of 
us — good-natured, appreciative of our complaints at being over-worked, well- 
informed. We were happy to have her with us even for only a year. 



37 



Former Members 



MARGARET BUCKLEY 

Our "Little Buckle" surprised us all by walking out on us at the end of her 
third year to assume full responsibility as a teacher. Buckle brightened many of 
our college hours with her unfailing appreciation of anything verging on the amus- 
ing. We've missed her this year, but we know that her lightdieartedness is filtering 
in and making a certain schoolroom a happy workshop. 



ROSE MASSACANI 

Rose left us thorns pricking our brains with punctures of knowledge while she 
went forth to sow seeds in Cheshire. We have often pictured her as she must have 
looked that first morning when she established her headquarters in an honest-to- 
goodness school and sized herself up with youngsters whom she no doubt had to 
look up to. We know her success as a teacher has been well affirmed, for Rose al- 
wavs worked well with us. 



38 



THE SENIOR LEGEND 



From the hamlets of the Berkshires, 

From North Adams in t he foothills, 

From the little towns surrounding. 

Came our tribe, the High School Seniors, 

fame the blondes, brunettes, and titians, 

Came the short, the tall and mighty, 

Eager for an education, 

Eager for the life at college. 

Then a new name were we given 

By the tribe of Upperclassmen, 

Frosh they called us, tribe of Freshmen, 

Lowliest tribe in all the village. 

At a meeting of the warriors 

We were forced to don our headdress, 

Forced to don bright yellow headdress, 

Low mentality implying. 

Radicals! the big chiefs called us. 

Problem children, stubborn, wild ones, 

Shook their heads at every pow-wow, 

Sought the counsel of their fathers 

Big Chiefs Thorndike, Freud, and Dewey, 

Sought a motive for the actions 

Of the Frosh, the tribe of Freshmen, 

Lowliest tribe in all the village. 

Soon our chieftains were elected, 

Chieftains of the tribe of Freshmen. 

From the big chiefs of our college, 

One we chose to be our mentor. 

One beloved by every member 

Was this dainty little teacher, 

"She the best of all musicians, 

She the sweetest of all singers," 

Offered counsel, words of wisdom 

To the Frosh, the tribe of Freshmen, 

Lowliest tribe in all the village. 

'Tis the custom of each new tribe 

To begin its social season 

With a festive dance and frolic. 

From the hamlets of the Berkshires, 

From North Adams in the foothills, 

From the little towns surrounding 

Came the escorts for our maidens, 



Dressed in plumage to attract them. 
Strange our sisters looked that evening, 
Strange their faces were with warpaint, 
Dancing, prancing to the tom-toms, 
At our festive Freshmen frolic. 
Months slipped by, 'til all too quickly 
June approached, and studies ended. 
We were free — no longer Freshmen, 
Lowliest tribe in all the village. 
Then a new name were we given, 
Sophomores, the tribe of guardians, 
Rulers of the new arrivals, 
Freshmen, lowest in the village. 
Our beloved Sweet Singer left us; 
Now a new guide we selected, 
Now a big chief, strong and mighty. 
So with dances, studies, pow-WOWS, 
And our climb up old Mount Greylock, 
Quickly passed our year as sophomores 
At our new lodge in the mountains, 
High among the noble Berkshires. 
Then a new name were we given, 
Juniors, tribe with disillusions. 
Now had come our time of suffering, 
Time of hard work, sacrifices. 
To the wilds the big chiefs sent us. 
Facing tribes of fierce papooses, 
Sent us to survive or perish. 
We survived, returned to homefires, 
Changed, matured, experienced, weary. 
Worthy of the name of Juniors, 
Worldly tribe and disillusioned. 
Now the Big Chiefs called together 
All the tribes, their friends and kinsmen, 
Bade them come to see us given 
Our rewards, three year diplomas. 
We were free — until the next year. 
Then a new name were we given, 
Seniors, haughty tribe and cliquey. 
Now a year of strife and struggle, 
Now a year of warfare followed, 
Sharp our words were, sharp as arrows. 



39 



Aimed at feelings, hurt and wounded. 
Great the problems now that faced us, 
Great one problem ever haunting. 
'Tis a custom of the college 
That each tribe before departing 
Leave some memoir for their sisters, 
Memoir of its years of progress 
From the lowly tribe of Freshmen 
To the haughty tribe of Seniors, 
So we tried to plan a yearbook, 
Tried to plan and tried to pay for. 
Huge the sum the printer wanted, 
Huge the sum for picture taking, 
Small the sum we had collected, 
Wampum! Wampum! was our war cry. 
After many a serious pow-wow, 
After many an hour of planning 
Lo! our yearbook was completed, 
Memoir of our years of progress, 
Memoir of the tribe of Seniors. 
Now approached the time of parting, 
Now new garments were we given, 
Long black robes and caps with tassels, 



Solemn, dignified, and stately, 

High mentality implying. 

Once again the Big Chiefs summoned 

All the tribes, their friends and kinsmen, 

Hade them come to see us given 

Our rewards — degree of bachelor. 

To the sound of pounding tom-toms, 

To the sound of horn and symbols, 

Slowly moved our long procession 

To the gathering of the Big Chiefs, 

Chiefs from far and distant hamlets 

Here to give degrees to seniors. 

Then a new name were we given 

By the Big Chief of our college, 

Graduates, the chieftain called us, 

Bachelors of Education. 

So we bade farewell to sisters, 

Said farewell to chieftains mighty, 

Started on our lonesome journey 

Toward a new world huge and frightening, 

Turned and waved farewell to college, 

Turned and sighed farewell to college — 

Graduates, alone — forgotten. 

Mildred Boyd 



40 



TREATY WITH THE IOWAS (I OWE 'YAS') 



On the grounds of Alma Mater 

Where our ivies are in order, 

We, the Seniors, none diviner, 

Teachers of young minds rebelling, 

Gave a sign for freshmen order, 

Stood above our younger sisters, 

Passed the peace-pipe from our circle. 

From our vision, mountains rooted 

Climbed up to the heav'ns unending, 

Stretched their topmost rows of timber 

Till they seemed to be hair standing; 

And the sun, with dying ember, 

At the end of journey daily 

Flung out beauteous shadows blending 

As she glided to her cradle. 

In a setting so conducive 

To the stir of red blood in us, 

With our hearts attuned to giving 

With our Indian ink free flowing, 

Tried to give our friends a bargain; 

Ceded them our prized plunder — 

With a sigh these gifts relinquished: 

For the meekest and the bravest, 

Known as freshmen by our people, 

Scalps of facts we all have murdered; 

For the gayest and the spryest, 

Sophs who've changed their ways to our ways, 

Guns with which to wage all Forums; 

For the brightest and the eldest, 

Juniors closest in their kinship, 

Booty with the warmth of color. 

As we scanned the group before us. 
With a sense of pride and duty 
We began to will to teachers 
Tilings to keep us in their inem'ries. 
To Squaw Weston soccer inj'ries — 
l'aw(k)nees barklcss from our battles; 
And, in view of future warriors, 
Left behind our bows and arrows 
And our Indian clubs SO stable 
All these, helps for fitness index. 



Xext came Big Chief Art Instructor, 

Big Chief Flagg with needs so many — 

Furs and skins for cold third floor room, 

Blankets showing our designing. 

With regret he sees us parting 

We who Shoshone in his classes 

When we into cakes of smooth soap 

Had to Chippeways as sculptors. 

To Squaw Lnderhill went corn sprouts 

Just to maize her garden watchers. 

Then to such a nature lover 

We unselfishly gave summer, — 

Our so gorgeous Indian summer 

Teeming with its harvests ripened; 

With this season for some hiking, 

Went swift moccasins and leggings. 

Great Spirit, we invoke thee 

As Squaw Donelson's new helper 

To keep books from transmigrating 

From this realm of books and pamphlets 

To unhappy hunting regions. 

With your faithful watch and guarding. 

She no more will be pursuing 

Girls we know she should be Siouxing. 

Our attention turned to music 

To Squaw Boyden and her trilling. 

She needs nightingales a humming 

Not Mo(re)hawks athwarting high notes 

Left our repertoire completed 

And canoes for Indian love calls. 

() Squaw Queeney, new arriver, 

To you Coppermines we donate 

For the many tears you may find 

As you renovate our dorm-home. 

Of us Seniors few were dorm girls, 

But a group so choice as we were 

Mope that next year's dorming inmates 

Will be cherubs just as beaming. 

'Hound our eyes went circling, searching 

For another needy suspect, 

Found our answer in Chief Cummings, 

Carpenter to use our Chick(a)saws. 



41 



Now Chief Venable is gloating 

O'er the noble gift we gave him. 

In his yard the Indian Ocean 

Will flow in and on forever 

So its venerable water 

Can evaluate leaf notebooks 

By its test of floating power. 

To Chief Holmes we recommended 

He continue his son worship, 

For we plan not to give ours up. 

For this same dramatic fixer 

Left we braids to use before plays, 

Braids of hair so sleek and jet-black. 

For Squaw Jenkins, next in order, 

Designated our papooses 

Young and innocent in conduct 

To be kept amused with seatwork, 

Seat work of a vital nature, 

Perhaps in the form of witchcraft. 

Hoofs that galloped loud and clanging 

Drew up to our Big Chief Luddy, 

For a pony he'll be needing 

As he travels to earth's corners, 

North to southward, east to westward, 

To keep time with nation's doings. 

Friendship of our distant tribesmen 

We bestowed upon Chief Broudy, 

Haunting his extension courses 

With an appetite for learning 

And for earning in profusion 

All degrees that can be offered. 

Now that needs of higher up-ers 

Had been met so well and wisely, 

Counsel gave we to all others 

To be careful in the future 

When in fire-drills, careless steppers 

Dodged the Indian filing system. 



Ruthie Denison's initials 

Sure to bring her wealth unbounded, 

In the garb of Indian R.E.D. dye, 

Were annexed to Connie Gingras; 

Tall Bert Ray with netk so stretchy 

Left her india-rubber neckwear 

To another shortie — Klammer; 

Charlotte van Dam, make-up model, 

Gave her warpaint to Booth — white man. 

O most worthy Senior tribesmen 

Who with me have shared dance honors 

For dance rhythm and fine costumes, 

What, what shall be the fate of 

Dance attire and our war bonnets, 

Our so gauzelike rainbowed costumes, 

Our sheer May Day gowns of beauty! 

Our next duty seemed apparent. 

We must choose some new tribe leaders 

To evoke our usual war cries 

For more homework, longer school days. 

For dorm privileges fewer. 

Long Louise, the basket tosser, 

Shall be known to all as Sky Land; 

Dotty Stead, who sleeps through breakfasts 

She as Hole-in-Day will answer; 

Ella Scace who tats unceasing 

Sits for hours on chairs four-legged, 

Shall be Sitting Bull's successor; 

Eunice Bettcher, a sleep walker 

Who crawls out of her nest nightly. 

She, as Little Crow must figure; 

Shirley Rudnick, blushing beauty. 

You shall be Red Cloud hereafter; 

Frmyn Russell and Ruth McKay, 

Classmates and the best of playmates. 

You shall stand out as our Two Joys. 



Special, private, dear, possessions 
Were soon willed to worthy users: 
Sigrid Lobdell's grand complexion 
To H. Gwozdz was warmly granted; 
Doris Jacob, hungry warrior, 
To Miss Potter, likewise hungry 
Gladly gave a cornmeal handout; 



With our treasures all bequeathed, 
With a war-whoop, beating tom-toms, 
To the land of the Great Spirit, 
Follow we the dim horizon 
E'er to dwell beyond tribe limits. 
Now Cherokee we with pleasure! 

Ruth Denison 



42 



PROPHECY OF '38 



By our smouldering council fire, 
By the hill we love so dearly, 
We head tribesmen of this council 
Prophesy what will o'ertake us, 
Prophesy the future bravely, 
As 'twill be in nineteen sixty, 
As 'twill be when we are forty. 

"Billie" Boyd will do some teaching: 
With this fact we'll not take issue; 
But she will not teach school always, 
For her hair has such great beauty 
That we'll see her picture often 
Advertising some new product; 
But we'll not be fooled by pictures, 
For we'll know there's just one "Billie." 

Ruth M. Cohen tells the story 

Of the world and what's before it, 

Of the things that make us truer, 

Braver and more loyal peoples, 

Tells us why the river leads us 

To a place where, though we fear it. 

We shall find that sought-for kindness, 

And these wars of tribes and nations 

Will all cease and be forgotten. 

She'll help teach a greater lesson 

Just as have so many others 

For her knowledge is so learned 

Chiefs will stop and heed her preaching 

She will make her presence needed 

Reaching heights where men will praise her. 

Since she helps them when they're troubled. 

M. C. Dempsey, in her tepee, 

Cooks and sews and does her cleaning. 

Hoes her garden, fixes flowers, 

Keeps her wigwam warm and spotless,— 

He'll be proud to bring his friends home; 

All this 'cause she goes to lectures. 

Learning all that they can teach her; 

Little wonder that she's happy. 

"Ruthie" Denison will flourish 
As a wife — but more important, 
She'll write clever little stories, 
Flip things for a younger public, 
Giving them shrewd bits of wisdom, 
Leading them without their knowing; 
But their parents will applaud her 
Thanking the Great Spirit for her. 



H. Gravelle paints famous pictures 
Of the sun, moon, sky and mountains, 
Of the chief who sits before us, 
Of the forests and the rivers; 
Many men acclaim her talents, 
Call her "artist" with obeisance; 
We are proud of having known her 
This great painter from our council. 

Jacob — "Dot" will lead men onward 

To new heights which they've long hoped for, 

On to truth and on to glory, 

Give them faith and give them courage. 

Give them things they've never dreamed of; 

She was such a good chief to us, 

She will be a chief to all men, 

She will lead and men will follow, 

Follow blindly where she leadeth, 

Faithful since she shows such wisdom. 

"Peg" Fa Fontaine brings us pageants 

With her music and her acting. 

With her voice SO low and thrilling; 

It is hard to tell between them 

Which her speech and which her playing; 

Though it really does not matter. 

For she does create much beauty, 

And we know that this suffices. 

"Babe" Lanoue will no doubt shudder 
When she hears this appellation. 
Now she is upon a mission 
Bringing news to all the nations 
From our big chief and his helpers; 
She makes treaties we have hoped for. 
Brings us things to make us better; 
She has really helped our country. 

Sigrid l.obdell far will journey, 
Leave behind her those who envy, 
For in Norway, as she's told us, 
She'll find things that she now covets; 
She will settle in that strange land, 
Settle there and be so happy 
Far from us but with her people, 
In that land of cold and sunshine. 

"Al" McGrath we'll see quite often 
In a tepee where folks gather; 
They'll eat slowly while they chatter 
Of the world and of their neighbors; 



43 



It is she who makes them happy, 
With a smile she finds them plaees, 
Calls them by their names politely. 
Makes them feel they are important; 
For as hostess she is perfect, 
Truly a delightful hostess. 

C. McCormick will amuse us, 

Since we'll find her quoted often; 

Yes, her wise and witty sayings 

Will hring mirth to those who read them. 

Even while they are inspiring 

Just the thoughts that she had hoped for; 

For she'll spur men on to glory 

While she makes them laugh at others. 

Betty Neyland far will travel 
Till at last she reaches Russia; 
She will be quite communistic. 
And if there should be a famine 
She will share her food with neighbors, 
Just as did her predecessors; 
She will teach them to be thrifty 
So they'll be a healthy people ; 
And for this they will acclaim her, 
Make her leader of their people, 
Proud will be her rank among them, — 
Being their first woman chieftain. 

"Flo" Peltier — "the entertainer" — 
Thus will read the signs about us; 
We shall hear of her fine dancing, 
Of her rhythm and her beauty, 
Of the steps she has invented, 
Telling stories of the ages, — 
"History in Dance" she calls it; 
This alone will make her famous. 

Bertha Bay, the great composer, 
(lives much music to her tribesmen, 
Music that will soothe and comfort, 
Music with great moods and fancies, 
Greater even than Debussy. 
This wee miss has other talents, 
And if lyrics too attract you 
She will write them with great fervor; 
They may rumble like the thunder, 
Or perhaps they'll tinkle softly; 
Anyway her words and music 
Will live on forever lasting. 



C. Rokita with her science 
Will astound those who surround her, 
Making cloth from almost nothing, 
Making food surpassing nature's; 
She will make us self-sufficient, 
One great tribe and all its people 
She'll make happy with her efforts, 
And they'll call her "Queen of Science." 

C. VanDam will be a model, 
And she'll show the Junior Leaguers 
How to wear their gowns of fashion, 
How to perch their hats correctly, 
How to choose their tiny slippers, 
How to don their lacey gauntlets; 
Of them all she'll be the envy, — 
She who is so chic and stylish. 

Leone Gould will start a bus line, 
So the transportation problem 
Of the girls who want to travel 
From this campfire to another 
May at least be made more easy; 
Oh, how many girls will praise her, 
Since they will not need to hurry, 
For her bus will wait right near here, 
Since she knows what she is doing. 

Mary Lalor, sweet and winsome, 
Makes so many lives seem brighter, 
For she goes to many houses, 
Bringing joy where'er she enters; 
Witli her smile she charms the millions, 
Making friends where others failed to, 
Making friends of all the people; 
She will teach them, she will help them. 

So this is our last prediction, 

As we slowly watch our fire 

We have built here die so surely. 

All we hope is — with our passing 

We'll perhaps be mourned a little, 

Hope we shall attain new summits; 

For it was around this campfire 

That we first learned how to reach them. 

And we'll not forget while rising 

That we had these small beginnings. 

Shirley Champlin 



44 



IVY POEM 



When first I saw your waxen ivy leaves 
'Twas after showers, fresh with shining drops. 
You clung, with gentle tendrils, to the wall 
As if its closeness helped you feel its strength, 
And its resistance to the storm could pass 
To you — encouraging your own self-pow'r. 

Perhaps, when time has gone its fleeting way 
And left us — stranded on the beach of strife, 
We too shall need support when storms appear 
We too shall need to feel a might supreme. 

Then shall we feel, oh ivy, just as you. 
The nearness of some staunch defender seems 
Conducive of a stream of courage, life. 
We also to our Alma Mater turn. 
The sureness and security it brings 
Re-echoes back to us, renews our hope. 

When show'r is by, and sunshine hours return. 
You may see us as first I saw you there. 
A tear or two, perhaps, yet still we'll cling 
To Alma Mater's ever helping hand. 



Bertha Ray 



45 



CLASS SONG 



College of ours through the years to come 

We'll he ever true to thee. 

In our hearts a faith and love 

Will live eternally. 

Here we have worked and played together 

Gaining treasures far dearer than gold. 

And though hard he the task we'll conquer, 

The name of our school uphold. 

And with faith in the trust we've placed in thee 

We'll ever reach our goal. 

Music — Helen Gravelle 
Words — Margaret Lanoue 



47 



UNDERGRADUATES 

Underclassmen, may you ever 
Keep the customs we've held dearly, 
Make our alma mater better, 
Make her proud to call you children. 




THE JUNIOR LEGEND 

All nature was resplendent during thai Indian Summer when the fair-skinned maidens of 

OUT tribe joined the Mohawks and the Greylocks. Perhaps the eager freshness of our laces appealed 
to the sympathetic nature of the older, wiser sisters, fur with cautious forethought ami diplomatic 
management they guided us along the trail to understanding. Keen-minded chieftains added their 
efforts to the forwarding of wisdom. Soon we realized that in order to receive the sheepskins we 
desired, we would have to burn the midnight oil. Not all our time was spent so laboriously. We 
climbed the lofty peaks about us, held tribal pow-wows of great ceremony, feasted, sang and danced 
together. In the costume of the ancients we portrayed the life before us. Then we parted for a short 
time. 

Again the gold-washed mountains greeted us as we returned to the familiar tepee on the hill. 
Our exuberant spirits had to be expressed through a big and festive Corn Dance before we settled 
down to the serious business of supervising the self-complacent new ones. We executed our duties 
and turned again to the more serious pursuit of knowledge. Long and earnestly we labored to 
collect enough wampum for a journey to the sea shore and bay town. Tribal reports will prove thai 
our maidens were most versatile and possessed many admirable qualities. 

These commendable attributes serve as excellent copy for our younger sisters and brothers, 
who vainly strive to follow in our footsteps. 

Xow the period of arduous training has arrived and as we struggle hopefully along still as- 
sisted by experienced leaders, we confidently aspire toward the last long climb — the period of 
testing and success! 

Janet Jillson, '39 



49 




THE LEGEND OF THE SOPHOMORES 

Long, long ago, to the North entrance of the Great Wigwam timidly ventured a few papooses 
of a greenish complexion. Big Sisters carefully guided stumbling mocassins; Big Chiefs thought- 
fully added great quantities of homework, until the freshly-entered ones were finally blanketed 
and bestowed with membership in the most learned tepee. The erstwhile silent group made raucous 
mark upon the buck-skinned calendar. Spirit Party, Planting Dance were theirs for celebration. 
Big Sing and Heap Big Study were their consideration. Thus came the eager youngsters to great 
learning. 

Many moons had risen and set, a long and joyous growing season had passed, before the same 
group once again approached the Great Wigwam, this time, however, entering by the South 
entrance and seating themselves in state upon the logs reserved for the Sophomore tribe. In realiza- 
tion of a great necessity, this mighty tribe at once undertook the task of acquainting ignorant 
children with the ceremonial rites and rituals of tribal life. All this was duly and satisfactorily 
performed. 

The harvest season was nearly spent before those merrymaking maidens urged one and all 
to don bright feathers and replenish paint for the initial and the best toe-trip of the year. 

Throughout the rule of hoary Winter and even in the young Spring's reign, Sophomoric 
enthusiasm, pep, and zeal were noted by the tribesmen. Each pow-wow, counsel, contest, and each 
session of learning was enlivened by lusty war-whoop and merry guffaw, symbols of that proud 
and lofty clan. 

Thus stood the record of the noble tribe of Sophomores on the birch-bound rolls of fame. 

Dorethy Stead, '40 



50 




THE LEGEND OF THE FRESHMEN 

With the harvest moon just coming, when t he cornfield stood erect, young braves of many 
nations, in from north and south Berkshire, from Franklin, and from farthest Hampden, in 
followed the trail of the great-eyed owl, the wise one, — followed so that others they could lead 
in the days to come. Thus they reached this House of Learning and assembled within the good 
wigwam, Taconic. At the first great council-fire they received the salutations and admonitions 
of Big Chief Bowman; with him they smoked the peace-pipe of good-will. The sign of friendship 
they received from all the chiefs and sachems, — the chief of all-good-English, the chief of all- 
that's-past, the medicine-man of nature, the keeper of the hooks, the guardian of well-being, 
the maker of the song, the master-friend of the rainbow, the witch-doctors of the mind. 

But the initiates were pounced upon by the budding warriors who had been sprouting for 
twelve moons. The young ones were stripped of their paint and make-up; their scalps removed 
with orange skull-caps. This and other humiliations they endured with stoicism up until the feast- 
day of Thanksgiving. However, on the eve of the day of saints the striplings invoked the spirits 
of ghosts and goblins, filled dark ways with webs and witches, and provided a merry pow-wow 
for the whole tribe. 

By the time of the season of Merry (living, big sister tribeswomen and little sister tribes- 
women, — not to mention three little brother tribesmen, — were united as one; then were there 
pleasant doings, songs and feasting, laughter and giftgiving at the wigwam, by the council-fire. 
In the midst of winter, with common fortitude, the whole tribe ran the examination gamut, the 
happy outcome of which was celebrated, at the coming of the robin, by a ceremonial dance fostered 
by the young braves. 

All the while, the tribe was increasing its wampum of knowledge with sparkling beads of 
learning. And when the Great Spirit sent the rays of flaming sun in a great rush upon the earth, 
the plucky young braves stuck a feather in their bonnets, — proud to be established as full- 
fledged members of the House of Learning in the Berkshires. 

Stanley Gradziel, '41 



51 



ACTIVITIES 

Music, drama, painting, reading, 
Soccer, tennis, baseball, hiking, 
These and many other pastimes 
Brightened hours of ivork and study. 




T, 



Student Council 

President •> ( > 1 ''-' Jacob '38 

Secretary-Treasurer Margaret Lanoue '38 



HROUGHOUT the school year we have frequently listened to the announce- 
ment, "The Student Council will meet . . ." and if the notice was not intimately 
connected with us, we immediately forgot about this group. 

Our able representatives do not receive the publicity given to other organiza- 
tions; yet they function efficiently and cooperatively for our benefit. The successful 
Christmas banquet, sponsored by the Council, is ample proof of their effective 
organization. 

We have been represnted not only at the New York Conference but also at 
the State Conference in Boston. 

We take this opportunity to voice our appreciation for the services of tins 
Council. 



53 




Nisatin Staff 



Editor-in -Chief 

Assistant 
Literary Editor 

Assistants 

Art Editor 
Business Manager 

Assistants 



Margaret Lanoue '38 

Mildred Boyd '38 

Bertha Ray '38 

(Ruth Denison '38 
'Shirley Champlin '38 
J Janet Jillson '39 
(Dorethy Stead '40 

Helen Gravelle '38 

Claire Dempsey '38 

(Margaret LaFontaine '38 
I Florence Peltier '38 



54 




T, 



The Dramatic Club 

President Claire Dempsey 

I 'ice- President Helen Gwozdz 

Secretary-Treasurer Rita McAndrews 

"The world's a theatre, the earth a stage, 
Which God and nature do with actors fill." 



Hevwood 



HE DRAMATIC Club opened another successful year by adding to its mem- 
bership a fund of new talent. 

They presented at one of our first student assemblies an interesting and amus- 
ing program on lighting, make-up and costuming. 

The club members have discussed current productions and have dramatized 
at their meetings scenes from the New York stage. 

If the activities of the Dramatic Club in the coming year are as commanding 
and as successful as those of the present year, the club will be kept busy weeding out 
the applicants to this growing organization. 



55 




President 

I ice- President 

Secretary- Treasurer 

Librarians 



Glee Club 



Helen Gravelle '38 

Louise Long '39 

Priscilla Booth '40 

i Ella Scace '41 
1 Helen Shea '40 



U: 



NDER Miss Lillian Boyden's able baton the Glee Club swung into action 
almost as soon as the college doors opened in September. 

The approaching Christmas holidays heralded not only coming cheer but the 
culmination of many weeks of hard work, the Concert. In addition to a program 
of numbers calculated to show the varied ability of the group a selection of carols 
was presented in which their natural charm was enhanced by flickering candle-light. 

Then on through the year the songsters celebrated each season in the appro- 
priate key at entertainments and exercises, besides the bi-weekly meetings. 

No Commencement Week could be quite complete without the aid of song. 
In this way the Glee Club brought to a close another successful year. 



56 






in 



Art Club 



c. 



President 

Secretary- Treasurer 
Program Chairman 



Beth Lane '40 
Grace Morse '40 
Elaine MeCormick '40 



dlARCOAL over one eyebrow, a paint brush thrust behind an ear, the Art 
Club dabs and putters to its heart's content. 

The year started ambitiously with several lectures and demonstrations by 
way of introduction to the types of media used, but before much experimentation 
could be tried an assembly program beckoned. New trends in Christinas decorations 
seemed to please everyone, including the "Daubers" themselves. 

Decorating here, designing there, the club suddenly acquired a real purpose. 
Noticing the drab walls of the dininghall, it decided to remedy matters. Accordingly, 
plans were made and designs plotted for murals to enliven those walls. Although 
this work will probably extend over several years, nevertheless the club is certain 
that a year that marked, besides the start of its career, the first steps of such an 
enterprise is quite a complete one. 



57 




W. A. A. 



President 

I ice- President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Head of Sports 



Charlotte van Dam '38 
Louise Long '39 
Dorethy Stead '40 
Louise Pignatielli '40 
Helen Donnis '39 



T. 



O THE tune of bruised knees the freshmen were introduced via the soccer 
Held to the activities of the W. A. A. Proving their mettle there, the next event 
was more than enough to faze even the hardened upperclassmen as up the Thunder- 
holt Ski Trail we labored to be rewarded by hot dogs and fun on Greylock's lofty 
peak. 

Plans for another winter carnival were dissolved when the necessary snow failed 
to appear, and only the rhythm of Helen Gravelle's orchestra a few weeks later 
could soothe our wounded spirits. 

Each sport held enthusiastic sway over the portion of the year it called its 
own. Inter-class games, hiking, and ladder tournaments accounted for our leisure 
time. 

Play Day and May Day joined hands for a colorful display in the late spring. 
And so the year was ended with the same energetic bang as marked its beginning. 



58 




Current Events Club 



/'resident 

Vice-President 

Secretary 



Priscilla Booth '40 
Marjorie Bower '39 
Margaret Russell '10 



O: 



'NE OF the largest clubs in the school, the Current Events Club has done much 
toward keeping its members from assuming that well-known attitude of ignoring 
the world at large, of seeing only as far as the limits of the campus. 

Every two weeks during the year this group met, listened critically to the care- 
fully prepared topics of several members, and discussed various points with vehem- 
ence. The score of material was broad, ranging from the Panay incident and the 
war in China along a varied course to current literature and movies. 

The value of such an organization can be measured only by noticing the in- 
creased interest in the newspapers and the intelligent answers forthcoming. Alto- 
gether the club looks back upon an enjoyable, worthwhile year and forward to the 
second. 



59 




Poetrv Club 



President 

f ice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



Florence Peltier '38 
Julia Mish '40 
Ruth Denison '38 



L 



<ADEX with books of favorite verse and armed with a dreamy look, off they 
trot for a few hours every two weeks to worship at their muse's feet and to mingle 
with fellow-worshippers. 

Keats, Swinburne, Lindsay! Sonnets, free verse, parodies. So on and on they 
read aloud, discuss, or just enjoy. Occasionally this avid and rather distant group 
appears in public with a bit of choral speaking but more frequently it remains hidden 
from all save the chosen few, its members. It has been rumored too that a few suc- 
cessful stabs at original verse have been made and that potential poets are in our 
midst. 

Although the year has now closed, volumes of poetry protrude from suitcases 
and bags, mute evidence that the love and appreciation of poetry has deepened 
through the influence of the club and its valuable, enjoyable experience. 



60 




The Photography Club 

President Stanley Gradziel 

J ice- President Mary Connors 

Treasurer Gerald ( lleary 

O^METHING new in the line of clubs was instituted this year, representative 
of the vital interest we have in pictorial art — a Photography Club. 

Mr. Blair, of Williamstown, lectured to this group several times and gave 
valuable instruction about developing film and printing pictures. 

It is understood by non-members that this club possesses a dark room — so 
perhaps their theme song is "Out of the Darkness." 

So far we have seen no candid camera shots of campus life, but we look for- 
ward to reviewing the interesting results of the members' future efforts in this field. 



61 




Ensemble 



Violins 

Cello 
Clarinet 
Trumpet 
Piano 



Beth Weston 

Margaret LaFountaine '38 

Lillian Boyden 

Louise Long '39 

Irma Klammer '39 

Ruth Tabor 'II 



62 



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I. Betty Neyland 2. Ruth Denison .'{. Mildred Boyd 

6, Helen Gravelle 7. Margaret LaFontaine 8. Bertha Ray 
11. Itutli Cowen 12. Doris Jacob 



4. Claire Dempsey 5. Sigrid Lodbell 

9. Florence Peltier 10. Charlotte Van Dam 

13. Margaret La none 



' \ 




! 



SENIOR CLASS 



Mildred Boyd 
Shirley -Jane Cham pi in 
Alexander Clement 
Ruth Cohen 

Margaret Claire Dempsey 
Ruth Denison 
Leone Gould 
Helen Gravelle 
Laurence Haskins 
Doris Jacob 
Margaret LaFontaine 
Mary Lai or 
Margaret Lanoue 
Sigrid Lohdell 
Clara McCormick 
Alice McGrath 
Elizabeth A. Neyland 
Florence Peltier 
Bertha Ray 
Agnes Reilly 
Charlotte Rokita 
Charlotte vanDam 



178 Church Street, North Adams 

411 High Street, Dalton 

15 Montana Street, North Adams 

82 John Street, Pittsfield 

71 Blackinton Street, North Adams 

12 Glenwood Avenue, Pittsfield 

Morrisville, Vermont 

11 Melrose Street, Adams 
Berlin Road, Williamstown 

12 Walker Street, North Adams 
22 Grove Street, Adams 

21 Conway Street, Greenfield 
50 Lawrence Avenue, North Adams 
Beacon Street, Housatonic 
278 Ashland Street, North Adams 
88 Summer Street, Adams 
133 Main Street, Williamstown 
92 Cleveland Avenue, North Adams 
10 Maple Street, Williamstown 
81 Holbrook Street, North Adams 
I Meadow Lane, Adams 
25 Hull Street, Pittsfield 



67 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Virginia Belanger 
Rita Belisle 
Marjorie Bower 
Margaret Clark 
Mary Connors 
Rita Conway 
Betty Davine 
Anne Degnan 
Edith Dodge 
Helen Donnis 
Elizabeth Dresbold 
Doris DuPont 



Agnes Fairbanks 
Helen Gwozdz 
Janet Jillson 
Helena Kennedy 
Mary Kidney 
Irma Klammer 
Louise Long 
Cecile Luksovicz 
Elizabeth Marshall 
R. Lucille Maxymillian 
Nan Sullivan 
Dorothy Whiteombe 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Eleanor Beneat 
Priscilla Booth 
Helen Brown 
Ruth Carpenter 
Mary Farren 
Constance Gingras 
Grace Eleanor Hall 
Anna Hayden 
Charlotte Hunt 
Olga Jurgilewicz 
Elizabeth Lane 
Jane Livermore 
Elaine McCormick 



Rita McAndrews 
Julia Mish 
Grace Morse 
Josephine O'Brien 
Louise Pignatielli 
Shirley Rudnick 
Margaret Russell 
Evelyn Rustemeyer 
Estelle Sarnecki 
Marion Shapiro 
Helen Shea 
Dorethy Stead 
Alice Warner 
Eleanor Wheeler 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Walter Barrett 
Frances Mary Barry 
Margaret Benedetti 
Marie Eunice Bettcher 
Constance Beverly 
Ruth Boyington 
Rose Butterly 
June Chase 
Gerald Cleary 
Claire Olive Collins 
Mary Flynn 
Margherita Garofalo 
Gladys Goddard 
Stanley Gradziel 
Dorothy Kruszyna 
Helen Leavens 



Ruth McKay 
Betty Pierson 
Christine Pike 
Helen Potter 
Helen Quinton 
Martha Rand 
Ermyn Russell 
Ella Scace 
Frances Scully 
Ernestine Smith 
Martha Stein 
Charlotte Stewart 
Priscilla Stuart 
Ruth Tabor 
Dolores Vanotti 
Marylyn Jennie Wincek 



68 



COLLEGE ANNUALS FINE ADVERTISING 

AND CATALOGS PRINTING 



EXCELSIOR PRINTING COMPANY 

PRINTERS RULERS BINDERS 

Quality Printing Need Not Be Costly 
PROCESS COLOR WORK 



Corner Bracewell Ave. and Houghton St. 
North Adams, - - - Massachusetts 

PHONE 59 



c'„ 


• 
cf til VII 


Uf ^-/t/.(, 


JL 


tvatated 






ENGRAVERS 




HALFTONES 






LINE CUTS 






BEN DAY and COLOR 








PROCESS 


CUTS 




TEN 


MROAIW A v 


SPRING PIElri macc 






TELEPHONE 


4-4909 


_*E- *1.L,L/, ATii iijtj. 



69 



S. ANES & CO. 

115 Main Street 
North Adams, Mass. 



HOMEMADE ICE CREAM 



DELICIOUS LUNCHEONS 



Fine Assortment of Homemade 
Candies 



Compliments of 

NORTH ADAMS 
NATIONAL BANK 

North Adams, Mass. 



Member of Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation 



VESTMENTS 
for Choir and Pulpit 

THE C. E. WARD CO. 

NEW LONDON, OHIO 

Graduation Caps and Gowns, 

Band Uniforms, Gowns for School 

Choirs and Glee Clubs 

Write for Free Catalogs 



H. W. CLARK COMPANY 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 

Since 1876 



Goldflower and Greylock Food 
Products are Health Builders 



70 



Compliments of 
A FRIEND 



FOR ARTISTIC PORTRAITS 
CALL 

SHAPIRO STUDIO 

Quality Work at No Higher Prices 

37 North St. Pittsfield, Mass. 

Telephone 2-7077 



TRY 



FISCHLEINS 



HOMEMADE ICE CREAM 



None Better 





WEST 


END BEAUTY 
SHOPPE 




30 Main Street 


Mr 


. and Mrs 


. Albert Richards, Props. 


We wish to 


thank the class of 1938 


for 


the fine 


cooperation given our 


shop and u 


ish yon all a successful 






future 



71 



Compliments of 
APOTHECARY HALL 

83 ' 2 MAIN ST. 

BOOTHMAN'S FLOWER SHOP 

62 MAIN ST. 

BROOKNER'S FUR SHOP 

88 MAIN ST. 

CARROL CUT RATE 

MAIN ST. 

HIRSCH'S DRUG STORE 

5 1 EAGLE ST. 

F. B. OLIVER & COMPANY 

18 STATE ST. 

SICILIANOS LUNCHEONETTE 

3 EAGLE ST. 



72 



AUTOGRAPHS 



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